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Category: The Holy Spirit and the Christian Life
“This is my brother, all that is mine is his. Let’s celebrate. For this brother of mine was lost, but now is found.” Christ is not ashamed to call you brother. To call you sister. To call you family. He has joined you to himself and brought you into the same affectionate embrace that he enjoys with the Father.
We are still waiting. We long each day for the return of Jesus Christ. Until that day we’ll wait for him with perseverance, with joy, and with total confidence that he will come, and we’ll be with him forever.
Knowing Jesus means knowing the Father. And Jesus doesn’t just whisper that you’re his brother or sister. He writes it large across the pages of the New Testament. He’s never ashamed to look you in the eye and say, “You’re family” (Heb. 2:11–12).
The church derives its life from the sweet fellowship of the Father, Son, and Spirit, creating a people of worship, fellowship, and mission who are animated by the gospel and empowered by the Word of God.
Do we need permission to grieve? Is grief selfish? Should we be afraid of what others think? Are we letting the side down? Is it better to tell lies and pretend we don’t feel any grief, saying we are okay when really our lives are falling apart?
His very eyes tell us that he understands, and his outstretched hands let us know that he has come to help. The scars from the nails remind us just how far his love goes. Here is One in whom we will find rest for our souls.
This is the first session from the teaching series “Weakness Our Strength: Learning from Christ Crucified” by John Hindley.
The Lord’s Prayer isn’t just a set liturgy or guide to prayer. It is an offering where Jesus extends to us the very keys of heaven that he himself possesses. He invites us to come to the Father as he does, to know the Father as he does—and on the very same terms. As he leads us to his Father, we discover that the goal of prayer is not that we get something from God, but that we get God himself.
The following are 20 quotes from Sinclair Ferguson’s new book, Worthy: Living in Light of the Gospel.